Travis P. Reed, DVM, MPH, DACVS-SABoard Certified Surgeon
    Education:

    Dr. Reed attended Michigan State University to obtain a Bachelor of Science degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology/Biotechnology. He remained at MSU for another 4 years to graduate from the College of Veterinary Medicine in 2009. Dr. Reed also achieved a Master of Public Health degree concurrently through the University of Minnesota in 2009. In 2016, he became Board Certified with the American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

    Experience:

    Throughout his working and professional education experiences in veterinary medicine, Dr. Reed has always been interested in how the body can heal in response to injury or illness. This led him down the road to specialize in small animal surgery. He completed a rotating internship at the Ontario Veterinary College in Canada and a surgical internship with the Veterinary Specialists of Rochester, NY. Dr. Reed completed his residency training in Annapolis, MD with Chesapeake Veterinary Surgical Specialists.  

    WVRC:

    On what he enjoys most about working at WVRC…“What I appreciate most about surgery is the opportunity to directly interact with the anatomy and/or physiology of a patient to help the body heal – I find this to be a rewarding professional challenge.”

    Affiliations:

    Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Surgeons – Small Animal
    American Veterinary Medical Association
    Wisconsin Veterinary Medical Association
    Milwaukee Veterinary Medical Association

    Professional Interests:

    Dr. Reed’s professional interests include minimally invasive surgery as well as thoracic, abdominal, and skin/reconstructive surgery. He also enjoys orthopedic and neurologic surgeries.  

    Research & Publications:

    Reed, TP, LA Thomas, FR Weeren, JD Ruth, BB Anders. A novel dextran polymer hydrogel local antimicrobial therapy in dogs: a pilot study. The Canadian Veterinary Journal. 2016;57(2):189-95.

    Reed, TP, BA Brisson, LK Schutt. Cystic ectopic lingual thyroid tissue in a male cat. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2011;239(7):981-984.

    Start typing and press Enter to search

    Mike Quigley, DVM Emergency ServiceCynthia Roberg, DVM Emergency Service